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Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
to happen to them going to school. >> brown: hari sreenivasan continues our series on broadband technology with a look at a new digital divide over how high-speed access and mobile devices are being used. >> woodruff: and mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: it was a day of diplomacy for president obama in the middle east. he promised jordan he would seek $200 million in much-needed help to cope with an influx of refugees from syria's war and before leaving israel, he brokered a critical conversation between two regional leaders. once again tonight, margaret warner reports. >> warner: this last working day of president obama's middle east trip saw an unexpected breakthrough on an issue that has hobbled u.s.
with the latest technology and libraries and laboratories that students need and the technology that students need to use-- to learn today. >> brown: another question i've heard is why all at once? i mean, this is-- it becomes a very disruptive thing when you do so many schools at one time. is the city prepared for this when you're going to have thousands of people, many buildings affected? >> well, we've been doing this a little bit at a time for last decade, frankly, and we're-- frankly, we're weary of having to go through this every single europe in chicago. every spring is school closing season. we want to be done with this business now, get it done with, right size of district. frankly, it's something that should have been done-- this is a problem that has been a decade-long independent making, should have been addressed before the current school board and school management at cps, is determined to not ignore those issues. i think frankly we would be disappointed in all of us if we didn't recognize this issue and address it and not be satisfied with the status quo and let's go on to the next
that they have to pay to get mine. >> brown: we continue our series on how broadband technology is changing our lives. tonight, a look at chattanooga, tennessee-- home of the nation's fastest internet connections. >> sreenivasan: and, spencer michaels has the story of photo journalists who risked their lives to tell the stories of iraqis in the early days of the war. >> as photographers, we're always looking for ways to communicate the urgency of horrible drama in these situations. >> brown: that's all ahead. on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers ke y. thank you. >> brown: president obama called on young israelis to
, as well as the actual technological designs that makes people want to be southern californians. >> reporter: southern californians like surfer c.d. kinley. >> got some vans. typical vans, socks, all of the rage right now. just cooler than white socks in general. >> reporter: speaking of cooler, is it cooler to ride an american-made surfboard, or an imported surfboard, say, from china? >> well, just to me personally, supporting a brand that's from california like infinity, who's been making boards here for 50 years, that's a lot cooler for me. >> reporter: and at least around here, that's how a lot of the cowabunga crowd still feels and still spends its money. >> brown: international trade and a call for reduced barriers was on the agenda this week, as treasury secretary jack lew met with top chinese leaders in beijing. no word yet if surfboards came up. >> sreenivasan: now, our series on broadband and how it's changing our habits, our work, our communities. tonight, we focus on why some cities are opting for even faster access and whether it will make sense for other places to
p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: president obama called on young israelis to see the world through palestinian eyes and challenged israeli and palestinian leaders to abandon formulas and habits that have blocked peace. but even amid his visit, the old threats and realities of violence were present. margaret warner reports from jerusalem. >> warner: the second day of the president's trip to israel and the west bank was met with rocket fire from one place mr. obama won't go: hamas-controlled gaza two landed in sderot, israel in a clear breach of the ceasefire between the islamist hamas faction and israel struck late last year. there were no injuries. a little-known militant group claimed responsibility, saying it wanted to show that israel could not pro
. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: today's supreme court arguments pitted a national law against a 2004 arizona voter registration bill. the case explores the extent of state powers against the controversial backdrop of voting restrictions. arizona's proposition 200 requires state residents to provide either a driver's license, passport, birth certificate or physical proof of citizenship before they can vote. but an existing federal law requires only a sworn statement of citizenship on a voter registration form. supporters say the arizona measure cuts down on voter fraud by keeping noncitizens from voting. but opponents argue the law unfairly tarring hes minorities, immigrants, and the elderly. the case is only the most recent dispute betw
.o.p. spent $10 million toward new minority outreach efforts and even more on technology and building an improved voter database. embrace comprehensive immigration reforms, and restructure its presidential nominating process to reduce the number of primary debates and settle on a nominee earlier in the year. former florida governor jeb bush used last week's conservative political action conference to foreshadow many of the conclusions contained in today's report. >> we must move beyond the divisive and extraneous issues that currently define the public debate. never again, never again can the republican party simply ride off... write off entire segments of our society because we assume our principles have limited appeal. they have broad appeal. >> ifill: but senator marco rubio told the conservative meeting that the party should not embrace change for its own sake. >> and so our challenge is to create an agenda applying our principles. our principles, they still work. applying our time-tested principles to the challenges of today. >> ifill: yet the biggest hit at last week's conferenc
provided by: >> bnsf railway. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org >> this is "bbc world news america." funding of this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, union bank, and fidelity investments. >> this is what a personal economy looks like. as life changes, fidelity can help you readjust your investments along the way, refocus as careers change and kids head off to college, and revisit your plan as retirement gets closer. wherever you are today, fidelity's guidance can help fine-tune your personal economy. fidelity investments -- turn here. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to know your business, offering specia
.loan foundatn. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org
started his own tech services company storm technologies during the boom years, is worried about a talent shortage in ireland. he wants more emphasis on science and mathematics education for irish kids, and an open door to bright young people like chugh from everywhere. >> we're looking at short-term, medium-term, long-term. we're going to change how we change work permits for non- irish national, so that will help bring in a lot more skilled computer science people into the irish economy. that will help bring in a lot more qualified, skilled computer science into the irish economy. >> suarez: but to have a healthy domestic economy, ireland can't just create great jobs for manipulating data on microchips. there's a role for potato chips too. this family has been growing potatoes for generations. irish potato consumption waned during the economic boom as irish tastes changed. the youngest generation of this family look for new markets and started a new business. gourmet potato chips called crisps here, kettled in small batches. after 18 months, they're selling in europe, asia, and to high-
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)